Day 111: Finishing the Furring

Monday
Before I left work, Brian handled a number of small projects at the house.  He taped the door, plugged the gap over the header (with a 2×6) and installed the trim.  He also inspected the insulation for other rips or tears so we’d be full steam ahead with the 4×4 plywood. Lastly, he ran some errands (paid for the gravel, picked up food, etc) so that we could get right to work when the shack was closed.

The final trim has been attached! One remaining drip cap - on the door - and the exterior is complete!

The final trim has been attached! One remaining drip cap – on the door – and the exterior is complete!

Oh and one other thing – fence repair.  We still have occasional ‘visitors’ who take out their angst on the fence that blocks off the shortcut from Combs to Idaho Street.  That run of “fencing” is mostly piles of old barbed wire, railroad ties and garbage collected off the property as well as a few t-posts and a run of green garden fence.  So Brian fixed the spot the entitled neighbor had used to cross over and will probably reinforce the area with the wire rabbit fence we had previously used for the dogs.

Additionally, while visiting the top of our hill, we found that someone had (again) made mischief at our southern corner.  This time, instead of knocking the t-posts askew, they removed the diagonal posts and made off with them.  It seems that the t-posts that were driven into the ground were too much trouble to steal so they took what was easy.

We are guessing whoever is causing trouble is a disgruntled hiker/biker who would prefer that we not fence in our yard.  Same with the lower, shortcut area.  Well, too bad suckers.  We’re now talking about a stone wall on the top of the hill since that is the area near the hiking trails of Boston Hill.  For the time being, we are not going to replace the diagonals since they will likely take them again unless they’re loaded in place by taut barbed wire.

This is how the top of the house looked right before starting the final furring strip. The insulation on the left has come undone from it's tape. We also had to drive in a few more screws to the furring strip on the right (see featured image at the top of post).

This is how the top of the house looked right before starting the final furring strip. The insulation on the left has come undone from it’s tape. We also had to drive in a few more screws to the furring strip on the right (see featured image at the top of post).

Back to the house – As soon I got off work, we connected the inverter to the Fit in to provide light and started strategizing about how to finish the top run of insulation.  The difficulty is in trying to hold the insulation up, against gravity, AND getting screws in to the 2×4 to hold it in place.

We decided to build two, A-frame stands to hold the 2×4.  Oh, and the 2×4 was not 16′ long – it was 23′ 4″ long, created by connecting a 16 foot-er and two scrap pieces. With our mega 2×4 resting on the two A-frame stands, we carefully and patiently pulled the insulation (which we had unrolled and staged atop the cross beams) over the top of the 2×4.  Once we had the insulation centered, we were ready to attach it.

We considered hoisting the 2×4 up in the middle and attaching it there first but the combined weight of the insulation and mega 2×4 was too heavy and unwieldy.  Thus, we went to one side, I held it up and Brian connected it.  We worked our way to the other side, driving in a screw every few feet and then voila, we were done attaching furring strips!  Phewwwweeee!

A-Frame stands after hoisting up onto the scaffold.

A-Frame stands after hoisting up onto the scaffold.  You can see the 2×4 in the foreground that is connected to the main 2×4 – that is how we made one long mega 2×4.  The insulation is staged to the right, on the cross beams.

After many minutes of frustrated (gentle) pulling, the insulation was settled on the 2x4.

After many minutes of frustrated (yet gentle) pulling, the insulation was settled on the 2×4.  Nice tunnel!

It's dark, but you can kind of see that the 2x4 is no longer on the A-frame stand. This was a moment of huge satisfaction!

It’s dark, but you can kind of see that the 2×4 is no longer on the A-frame stand. This was a moment of huge satisfaction!

Once the 2x4 was attached, we took the A-frames down and shot a few pics. Tomorrow, we will tape the insulation down and complete the top runs of plywood paneling.

Once the 2×4 was attached, we took the A-frames down and shot a few pics. Tomorrow, we will tape the insulation down and complete the top runs of plywood panelling.

One last view of the amazing insulation installation. After 1-2 more days, no more scaffold work! Hurrah!

One last view of the amazing insulation installation. After 1-2 more days, no more scaffold work! Hurrah!

For a full summary of our experience with Arched Cabins, please read Arched Cabin Summary.

2 thoughts on “Day 111: Finishing the Furring

  1. Jeff Beck

    I have a suggestion, regarding people trespassing and damaging your fence.
    There is a practice, known as, “Prescriptive easement”, which allows people to retain access through and across your property.

    If you google it, read up on it, you would assume a fence establishes your property line.

    I have seen judges rule against case law, and allow people to retain this right.

    The most effective thing you can do, is to post a sign, which reads “No Trespassing”, “Private Property”, “No Public Access”, something to that effect.

    You (and most reasonable people) would assume that putting up a fence, sends that same message.

    But judges always seem to resort to the “was it posted”? defense, for the trespassers. As if, you building on YOUR land, somehow limits their freedom to trespass.

    I would say definitely rebuild the fence, but also post a clearly visible sign.

    Just a suggestion, I enjoy reading about your progess. Good luck on your on going project.

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      Thanks for the advice – we actually have several signs posted. We have “Private Property No Trespassing” and “Beware of Dog” facing both access points (total of 4 signs). We’re doing our best to make it obvious but some people clearly don’t care. Once we are living there we plan to make a more formidable fence as well as allow Sydney to bark ferociously at anybody who attempts to cross.

      Thanks for reading!

      Reply

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