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high desert. small house.

Days 15-18 – More Studs & The Painting Begins

Thursday
A late start due to work, food prep and shopping for building materials.  We finished cutting the studs and painted the door & door jamb.  It was 9:00pm and very dark when we called it a night.  The Sherwin-Williams Resilience paint dries really fast and is not super user friendly.  It also didn’t spread far so we’re going to pick up another quart for the second coat.

Friday
While waiting for the second quart of the door paint, I asked if my coverage experience was typical of the brand.  The Paintmaster explained that if I prepped my rollers by soaking them in water, I’d get better coverage and a smoother, more even application.  Alrighty-then, add another roller and brush to the order.  [The first time we met the Paintmaster, he emerged from behind the counter sock-footed because he had been polishing his boots with the paint shaking equipment.]

Painting the second coat was a much more pleasant experience because I had some LIGHT.  Painting at nighttime by lantern is not advisable.  It worked for the first coat but it was nice to put the second coat on with precision and confidence.

Painting the second coat - the hardest part was the underside of the jamb.

Painting the second coat – the hardest part was the underside of the jamb.

Brian FINALLY finished the south side end cap studly business.  The addition of horizontal studs really firmed up the LP Smartside attachment and we feel confident it is now ready for the next step.

South wall with the horizontal studs.  Much more rigid and much mo better

South wall with the horizontal studs. Much more rigid panels and much mo better.

Saturday
So much work, so much progress.  More nailing and a third coat of paint on the door.  I finished trimming the trim.  We had to take a break due to a torrential downpour (0% chance of precipitation according to the forecast).  Brian completed the additional nailing on the south side.  To finish the day, we teamed up to work on the north side reinforcements.  I stayed inside to identify the stud locations and yelled or stuck my arm out the window to point out the location to Brian (who was outside on the ladder).

Called "Radish" the door color came out much brighter than the burgundy-esque color we thought we picked out.  After starting to paint, I quickly realized the color swatch did not look exactly like the dot of paint on the can, which did not look exactly like the finished painted object.  The first coat looked a little like a purple version of pepto bismal but the finished door looks beautiful.

Called “Radish” the door color came out much brighter than the burgundy-esque color we thought we picked out. After starting to paint, I quickly realized the color swatch did not look exactly like the dot of paint on the can, which did not look exactly like the finished painted object. The first coat looked a little like a purple version of pepto bismal but the finished door looks beautiful.  We especially enjoy the contrast between the radish and the oil-rubbed bronze of the lock-set.

A positive spin on the end caps’ poor craftsmanship – They drove the nails in much too far, thus requiring us to go over the entire surface and add nails to replace their sucky nails.  Because we had to do this, we discovered two other issues that we may have missed otherwise.  A)  Some nails did not even go into studs and B) As mentioned previously, many panels were inordinately bowing out from not enough stud connection points.

So while correcting their nails, we found the other issues and the walls are much more sound now.  GO TEAM!

Sunday
We arrived at the house around 10:30am.  Having marked out the stud locations on the north side, Brian immediately took to the ladder to nail and I headed inside to prime the trim ends.

Brian nailing the studs on the north wall. Trippy, right?

Brian nailing the studs on the north wall. Trippy, right?  [By the way, he hammered in over 5 lbs of nails over the weekend.]

The south wall nailing took a long time on Sunday.  The intense sunshine did not help matters much but at least we could see everything in great detail.  I now have a perma-tank top and Brian is sporting a set of faint pink knee-high socks (i.e. we both have some sun burns).  I painted the first coat on the trim backs and sides around midday and did the second coat that evening.  Brian finished the nailing on the north side and did nearly all the caulking on the south side.

Trim ends primed.  So glad we bought saw horses.

Trim ends primed. So glad we bought saw horses.

Trim backs with first coat.

Trim backs with first coat.  The trim color is called “Heron’s Plume”.  When we were selecting our trim white/cream/grey color, we were a little overwhelmed by how many choices there were.  Noticing that many colors were named after birds, flowers, seasons, and other silly things, I jokingly said, “Let’s pick our colors based on bird references.”  As soon as I said it, we looked at each other and realized it was an excellent filter for choosing the trim.  Heron’s Plume it is.  [This is not an advertisement for Stanley.]

We learned an important lesson about nailing and caulking.  So several days ago, I went ahead and nailed the lower studs and caulked the seams and nail holes.  Brian then started to do the top studs.  It was while he was working high up that we realized the walls needed more studs all over.  After he added the studs, there was more lower level work to do (where I had previously already nailed and caulked).  Once he nailed the siding to these new lower studs, most of the caulking that I had done was cracked or split from the force of re-positioning the walls.  Lesson of the day:  Work flow should be – all studs, then all nailing and lastly caulking.

Between trim sessions, I ran errands and worked on the property itself.  We are digging a trench at the base of our hill to redirect water away from the house.  The gravel that I remove is then placed on the low spots near the house that were previously collecting some water and causing mud zones.  I also took up arms against the cholla poops.

Between house projects, I worked on the trench and cleared our hill path of cholla poops (the pieces of the cactus that collect in a pile and grab onto your unsuspecting ankles).

Between house projects, I worked on the trench and cleared our hill path of cholla poops (the pieces of the cactus that fall off, collect in a pile and grab the unsuspecting pads of puppies).

We worked as late as we could and called it a night around 8:45pm.  All of the Sunday errands had yet to occur – laundry, grocery shopping, dinner making, showers.  We have become very efficient with our time, however, so we were able to get all of that done and be in bed by 10:50pm.

We hope to finish caulking both walls tonight and get the trim fronts painted.  Maybe I’ll finish my trench.  If the weather holds, we might get the first coat of wall paint applied on Tuesday.  Second coat Wednesday and door installation Thursday.

PS.  Unfortunately, after 5 months of being left out adjacent to a public open space, someone stole/hid/removed our beloved zero gravity chairs off the property sometime between Thursday and Sunday.  Perhaps we should’ve moved them when we noticed the other people had sat in them.  Anyhow, Brian, our go-to man for a can-do attitude, interpreted this event as a pithy justification for a perimeter fence install (in case the neighbors question it).  I, on the other hand, view this as reason to purchase shotguns.

Beautiful weekend clouds #1

Beautiful weekend clouds #1 – Gomez Peak is the pointy mountain

Beautiful weekend clouds #2 - check out the rainbow to the left.

Beautiful weekend clouds #2 – check out the rainbow to the left.  So much contrast!

Beautiful weekend clouds #3 - Rainbow closeup.

Computer – Enhance.

For a full summary of our experience with Arched Cabins, please read Arched Cabin Summary.

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