Days 235-236: Drain Plumbing, Part I

Saturday, 3/5
We reviewed the clearance requirements for the bathroom earlier in the day so we were ready when it was house project time.  Brian left work early, made a few purchases at the hardware stores and then started at the house.

When I joined him after work, he showed me the process of attaching the outlets.  He drilled the first drain plumbing hole; we are starting with the toilet and working toward the shower.

Brian assembled the shower stall so he could know the exact location of the drain hole prior to drilling.

Brian assembled the shower stall so he could know the exact location of the drain hole prior to drilling.

Sunday, 3/6
Pretty windy day!  Thankfully, most of our work was inside.  The only outside stuff was drilling a hole up into the plumbing wall (the hole saw could only go about halfway through from either direction) and cutting the PVC pipe.

As you can see in the featured image at the top, we used a metal hose clamp to help guide the (out-of-control) Sawzall blade.  The ideal blade is not the one depicted – it is a taller, thicker metal cutting blade which is less floppy (e.g. a Milwaukee ‘Torch’ blade).  We have one such blade but it is too short so we could only use it to make the initial penetration, after which we switched to the longer (floppy) blade.  We did not use the hose clamp with the first couple of pipe cuts and they ended up not-at-all-square.

We took everything out of the bathroom so somebody could be making holes in the floor and then worked on outlets.  Because these holes are smaller, we only had to do one run to the apartment to charge the battery.

Shower enclosure disassembled - look at our neat shelves!

Shower enclosure disassembled – look at our neat shelves!

Thickness of the floor material once removed with the hole saw.

Thickness of the floor material once removed with the hole saw.  5/8″ underlayment plus 3/4″ subfloor.

Thinking about outlets ... I found that the foam packing block from the toilet box makes an excellent seat. Otherwise, trying to work that close to the ground is a real pain.

Thinking about outlets … I found that the foam packing block from the toilet box makes an excellent seat. Otherwise, trying to work that close to the ground is a real pain.

Outlet secured in place

Outlet secured in place. (Brian working on sink drain hole in background.)

4 thoughts on “Days 235-236: Drain Plumbing, Part I

  1. Greg Gadd

    ? Now that you have trimmed out electrical, what about sheetrock? Or whatever you are using for wall treatment? They have to be pulled. Be doing double duty, putting it all back.

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      So people ARE reading the blog! Yahhhhh, we messed that one up. We are using wood paneling instead of sheetrock but in either case, the wall material should have been done first. I don’t know what we were thinking!

      Reply
  2. Greg Gadd

    Looking GREAT. If your mother and I ever get to build one more house, I want a shower wall like yours”for all of moms shampoos and gels”LOL. Outlets look great! Nice and square in the box, so sorry about your frustrations (with them).

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      Haha – the shelves are so awesome! And I like that it’s going to be easier to clean than a tub setup.

      Reply

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