Days 303-304: Paneling Part XIII, The West Wall Begins

Thursday, 5/12
We have been really looking forward to paneling the west and east walls because they will consist mostly of straight cuts.  Each row is 5 full panels and then a partial [seams staggered]. Then, once we reach the lowest row, we’ll have to cut a few outlet openings.  Easy!

With The Paneling Ram constructed and the additional Milwaukee battery in hand, Brian was ready to go!

We decided to get a smaller battery for the other Milwaukee tools. Not only did it save us some money but it's also light. Plus, the first battery had so much capacity that it rarely needed to be charged. This one will be just fine.

We decided to get a smaller (1.5 AH) battery for the other Milwaukee tools.  Not only did it save us some money but it’s also significantly lighter. Plus, the first battery (3.0 AH) had so much capacity that it rarely needed to be charged.  According to Brian: “Half of forever is still forever”.

When we did our mid-day check-in, I asked how paneling was going.  In order to make The Paneling Ram as safe and as effective as possible, Brian decided to make a few modifications, including a rope pulley system for holding the arm in place while adjusting the location of the contraption.  He also decided to inhibit the safety feature of the circular saw so it would stop interfering with precision cuts on the vertical furring strips.

Oh yeah, and before paneling could begin, he had to go through the preparatory steps – spray foam the seam to the endcap, tape any rips, wipe down the insulation foil and cut vertical furring strips.

I forgot to mention yesterday that I arrived at the house at the same time as our friend, Danny. He builds houses all day long and came by to check our progress. Since Brian was in the midst of manhandling The Paneling Ram, Danny immediately jumped up the two scaffolds to help. Here, they're testing our the effectiveness of the counterweight in holding the panel on.

I forgot to mention yesterday that I arrived at the house at the same time as our friend, Danny. He builds houses all day long and came by to check our progress. Since Brian was in the midst of manhandling The Paneling Ram, Danny immediately jumped up the two scaffolds to help. Here, they’re testing out the effectiveness of the counterweight in holding the panel against the wall.

Danny helped us build the big wooden scaffold way back in

Danny helped us build the big wooden scaffold way back around Day 107.  While doing so, he would walk across the cross-beams with NO HANDS , just holding onto nearby air for balance.  I think he’s sitting on the scaffold edge in this picture but just know, if you work in this industry, you gain the power to do amazing and dangerous things.

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Foam seal complete for this row. This separates the dusty cellulose endcap insulation area from the clean foil insulation area.

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Since the way the furring strips attached here made the foil partially inaccessible to seal with tape, spray foam is used to finish the job.

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Removing dust accumulation from the foil insulation.

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First three panels of the third row are now attached.

Friday, 5/13
We made a test bead of the DAP Dynaflex 230 Almond caulk on Thursday and allowed it to dry.  We evaluated it on Friday – It’s a nice color but might be too bright/light.  The only other tan/brown/beige color locally available is called ‘Brown’ and it’s dark brown.  It’s a tough call.  The seams are presently not filled in and they look dark.  They look good dark.  Would they look as good if we filled them with something light?

Caulk test - The bead of caulk on the plywood is 'Almond' and is the DAP tube right above it. The other tube is another locally available color, called 'Tan', by Sascho. We'd prefer to stick with the DAP brand so we might look at 'brown'.

Caulk test – The bead of caulk on the plywood is ‘Almond’ and is the DAP tube right above it. The other tube is ‘Tan’ of another locally available caulk, called ‘Big Stretch’, by Sascho. Although we have not tried Big Stretch, we’d tentatively prefer to stick with the Dynaflex 230 because we hear it’s a little easier to apply in tight beads.  Next, we might look at DAP ‘brown’.

The Paneling Ram works in conjunction with two screws attached under the panel. The screws keep the panel from giving into gravity and the Ram keeps it against the wall.

The Paneling Ram works in conjunction with two screws attached under the panel. The screws keep the panel from giving into gravity and the Ram keeps it against the wall.

The Paneling Ram in action!

The Paneling Ram in action!

Something about tape.

Brian started using the HVAC foil tape to shore up any unsticking gaps in the Venture Tape.  That Nashua foil tape has an amazing adhesive.

The first row (or really, the third row) did require some cuts for the cross beams.

The first row (or really, the third row) required pesky cutouts for the cross beams.

The new weight structure...off balance

The new weight structure – a stack of plywood and 2x6s – made the Paneling Ram more powerful yet more unwieldy.

I'm "helping" and Sydney is sitting on my leg. I think she thinks I'm Santa Claus.

I’m “helping” and Sydney is sitting on my leg. I think she thinks I’m Santa Claus.

Isn't it beautiful! West wall - Three rows complete.

Isn’t it beautiful! West wall?- Three rows complete.

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