Days 307-309: Paneling Part XV, The East Wall Begins

Monday, 5/16
In our spare moments, while eating meals or waiting for the next car’s order, we are continuing our research on what “vehicle” will replace our second car.  We have found a few intriguing electric bike options and are looking forward to test driving them.  Design elements that are desirable (for us) –

  • Disc brakes – Brian doesn’t want to deal with brake fluid so hydraulic brakes are out and mechanical disc brakes are in.
  • Less than $1600 – There are TONS of electric bike options.  The lowest ones that we have seen that we like are around $1400, but they go up to nearly $10,000.  With a $1600 or less price tag, we might eventually get two and park the Fit most of the time.
    • Based on what we’ve spent so far this year, excluding our drive to Tucson once a month, we average about $60/month in gas for around-town travel ($720/year).
    • We currently pay $54/month ($648/year) to insure the Smart car.
    • If we were to extend the Smart car lease, we would continue paying $139/month ($1668/year).
    • If you look at those numbers, basically the gas savings + insurance would pay for one electric bike and the lease payments would pay for a second.
  • Cargo bike format vs. mountain bike format w/ rack – We have seen some super cool cargo bikes with integrated racks.  With their stuff carrying capacity, they truly are a car replacement.  However, because they’re often bigger and heavier and we will continue to have a car car, we are leaning away from this option.  Something that might work better is a bike with a milk crate – big enough to grab groceries but not the focus of the bike design.  But either way, we have to be able to carry some stuff.
  • Mid-drive/Center-drive – based on research so far, Brian is prefers hub-drive motors over mid-drive due to simplicity and drive train redundancy (the hub motor and pedal systems are completely independent and thus if one doesn’t work it has no effect on the other)
While I opened Bean Vivant, Brian ran to the as of yet unchecked hardware store to see what their caulk selection was like. Prior to this visit, we had decided to go with DAP brown (shown center). Now, he's leaning toward DAP _____ and I'm leaning toward indifference.

While I opened Bean Vivant, Brian ran to the last unexplored local hardware store to see what their caulk selection was like. Prior to this visit, we had decided to go with DAP Dynaflex 230 brown (shown center). Now, he’s leaning toward DAP dark bronze (shown left) and I’m leaning toward indifference.

Brian started by removing the last panel we had connected on Sunday and applying the missing spray foam.  [As we were falling asleep the previous night, Brian suddenly said, “I don’t think I sprayed the foam behind that last panel.”  To which I replied, “Are you sure?  I shook the can for 2 minutes and then handed it to you.  Do you remember what happened at that point?”

Neither of us remembered whether he did it so he knew he had to check on Monday.  Sure enough, no spray foam.  That’s what happens when you work the whole day and let yourself get tired and hungry.]

Once that was done, he started on the east side.  The first panel required a cutout for a cross beam.  After cutting it, he realized it was nearly a half inch off (Gaaahhh!).  Miraculously, it ended up working for the second panel that row instead – the crossbeam cut out was perfect.

A friend of ours popped over to see if he could be of service.  With him there, Brian didn’t have to use The Paneling Ram and was able to move faster.  With the first two panels out of the way, they went on to finish the entire wall!!!  Psych…

They discovered that the panels that are supposed to go on the curved part of the bathroom walls don’t slide behind the arch-cut bathroom walls as they are.  Although the bathroom walls were cut to fit with a piece of tri-ply attached to the wall where they intersect PLUS the required 1/8″ gap, the effect of the vertical furring strips was not accounted for – they change the smooth arch into a series of straight lines.  The picture depicts it best.

The first two panels are done! And the next panel or two are whole panels with no cuts. So once the bathroom wall situation is fixed, this row should move quickly.

The first two east wall panels are done! And the next panel or two are whole panels with no cuts. So once the bathroom wall situation is fixed, this row should move quickly.

Problem - Straight vertical furring strip is hitting the bathroom wall about midday. The angle created by this collision means the vertical furring strip won't connect properly to the furring strip above.

Problem – Straight vertical furring strip is hitting the bathroom wall about midway. The angle created by this collision means the vertical furring strip won’t even connect properly to the furring strip above, never mind any paneling.

Brian brought me a bunch of gifts so we can debate our caulk choice. This is a sample of our paneling with the polyurethane applied, the tile and the two shades of caulk. The leading arguments - The brown matches the crossbeams but the dark grey ties in nicely with the tile.

Brian brought me a bunch of gifts so we can debate our caulk choice. This is a sample of our paneling with the polyurethane applied, the tile and the two shades of caulk. The leading arguments – The brown matches the crossbeams but the dark grey ties in nicely with the tile.

Tuesday, 5/17
Brian had a late start at the house due to an extended roast session at the shack.  He spent some time figuring out how to fix our panel-bathroom collision problem.  Thankfully, he was able to cut the panels back without removing them.  It would have been a nightmare if he had had to remove the ceiling panel from the bathroom.

He made the lines for where to cut.

He made the lines for where to cut.

Thank you for your service, super precise oscillating tool.

Thank you for your service, super precise oscillating tool.

Resulting scraps after the surgery.

Resulting scraps after the surgery.

Wednesday, 5/18
Another busy coffee day and a smaller house project window.  In order to do the two panels behind the bathroom, Brian had to remove all our storage junk off the bathroom and transfer his work station up there.  After a successful attachment process with the first panel, he found out that the next panel did need to be trimmed to accommodate a crossbeam.  That was tricky given it was hidden in the framing for the bathroom.

Thank you bathroom for holding the panel in place.

Thank you bathroom for holding the panel in place.

Hey hammer, good job! Thank you for helping out in place of The Paneling Ram.

Hey hammer, good job! Thank you for helping out in place of The Paneling Ram.

The two panels inside the bathroom.

The two panels inside the bathroom.  See the cross beam on the right – the plumbing wall is built up to and on top of that.

The north side of the bathroom worked out well but the south side ended up being a little too tight, despite trimming it the day before.

The north side of the bathroom worked out well but the south side ended up being a little too tight, despite trimming it the day before.

After another cleansing sawdust face shower, the gap is correct.

After another cleansing sawdust face shower, the gap is correct.

Does your tongue hang down? Does it nearly touch the ground? Can you slobber on your friends? Can you wrap it round ink pens? Can you throw it down your back? Like a human's back back? Does your tongue hang down?!!

Does your tongue hang down?
Does it nearly touch the ground?
Can you slobber on your friends?
Can you wrap it round ink pens?
Can you throw it down your back?
Like a slimy, weird backpack?
Does your tongue hang down?!!

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