Days 310-313: Paneling Part XVI, Finishing the East Wall

Thursday, 5/19
Brian had to run to the house early Thursday morning and he was greeted by this beautiful scene.

2016-05-19 06.44.47

Yup, this is our sanctuary. All beasts and feathered friends are welcome. Humans, please observe the No Trespassing signs and stay out.

Brian finished the remaining two panels in the third row by 3pm-ish and spent the rest of the afternoon starting on the second-to-last row.  The Paneling Ram can now be retired and we will return to the use of Captain Leaning 2×4.  This next row should be fairly straightforward, except for the inside bathroom panels, which may require some extra finesse due to wiring cut outs.

A nice shot of The Paneling Ram in action.

A nice shot of The Paneling Ram in action.

Third row complete!

Third row complete!

Conflict discovery: after attaching the first panel in the fourth row, Brian found an order-of-events problem.  We want to use caulk to seal between the panels of the east wall.  However we weren’t planning on doing any caulking until after the polyurethane had “fully cured” [7 days according to the label].  The issue is that when the bathroom’s arch-wall-touching panels are in place, they block the access needed to caulk between them.

Thus, it looks like the plan is going to be –

  • Remove the four, 8 foot tall panels that are on the bathroom, near the connection to the arched wall.
  • Finish paneling the east wall
  • Countersink screws on & apply polyurethane to only those panels on the east arched wall that are bordering areas soon be inaccessible.  This gives THAT polyurethane a head start on curing.
  • Countersink all the rest of the screws (allllllllll the screws) and add missing bridge screws where needed to make smooth seams
  • Apply polyurethane to the rest of the house (cure time commences)
  • Hopefully, the polyurethane adjacent to the the inaccessible zone is now cured. If so, caulk seams there.
  • Reattach the 4, 8′ panels of the bathroom and countersink screws
  • Polyurethane the pocket door side of the bathroom and the roof/floor of it
  • Caulk and paint 2 other outer bathroom walls (kitchen and piano walls) and the whole interior of bathroom (interior will be semigloss or gloss). [caulk can go under paint within a few hours, whereas polyurethane must be caulked OVER and only after days of cure time]
  • Order our refrigerator and our induction burner.
  • Tilesman lays Ditra and tile; we go under house and attach plywood to protect the insulation.
  • Tilesman should finish in about 4-5 days, roughly coinciding with the cure completion of the polyurethane.
  • Tile done, polyurethane cured.  Now caulk alllllllll the seams of the polyurethanated panels
  • Attach light fixtures, install toilet, put cabinets in place, install water heater, order our counter-top (it’s local and should be very fast), install sinks.
First panel of fourth row complete.

First panel of fourth row complete.

Adding furring strip ....

Adding vertical furring strip amidst electrical obstacles on the horizontal – see below ….

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Some quick cut outs were needed with the oscillating tool to fit up against the Christmas tree.

Friday, 5/20
Good work, good day and it was Friday to boot.  Brian removed the bathroom panels and attached the panels that go on the arched wall.  By the time I arrived, he was prepping the first panel outside of the bathroom, on the north side.  I left him to go get a jump start on domestic responsibilities for the weekend.

I took care of vacuuming, laundry, making lunch for the next few days, making dinner, doing dishes and tidying up.  When Brian came in, he was so surprised by the progress, he asked, “How long have you been here!?”  Ta-da!  He had wrapped up that panel before heading home, leaving only 1 full and 1 partial panel in that row.  So close to being done!

Remove bathroom panels - check.

Brian removed the bathroom panels to gain access to the arched wall.

Find safe place to stash bathroom panels - check.

Safe storage place for the bathroom panels.

Utilizing Captain Leaning 2x4 to start the attachment of the tricky panels.

Utilizing Captain Leaning 2×4 to start the attachment of the tricky panels.  This one was the worst because it required cuts for all those electrical wires AND a crossbeam cutout.

Ta-da! Good job Brian.

Ta-da! Good job Brian.

Day end progress, view from the kitchen side.

Day end progress, view from the kitchen side.

Day end progress

Day end progress, view from the bedroom side.

Saturday, 5/21
Taping, wiping, cutting, paneling…

Day end progress - four panels attached. Four more to go - two of them involving the tricky bathroom wires.

Day end progress – four panels attached. Four more to go – two of them involving the tricky bathroom wires.

Sunday, 5/22 (Part 1)
Gosh what a day.  We were paneling by 9:30am and took our first break at 12:30pm.  Back at the house by 1:30pm and done with paneling by 3:45pm.  WE FINISHED THE PANELING.  HALLELUJAH!!

After a break to take pictures and discuss our plan going forward, we began the next chapter of the house project.

Progress right before lunch break - we had completed the very tricky span of panels that go behind the bathroom.

Progress right before lunch break – we had completed the very tricky span of panels that go behind the bathroom.

In completing the bathroom panels, we found that a 4x4 sheet would terminate directly atop the electrical wiring. Thus, we had to cut the panel short, attach an extra vertical furring strip and then run another 4x4 panel to bridge the wire area.

In completing the bathroom panels, we found that a 4×4 sheet would terminate directly atop the electrical wiring. Thus, we had to cut a panel short, attach an extra vertical furring strip and then run another 4×4 panel to bridge the wire area.  Although we broke the panel pattern, we staggered the seam by the same amount in the opposite direction.

Brian recently started using a utility knife for the final electrical box trimming.

Brian recently started using a utility knife for the final electrical box trimming.

We remembered to weatherize the outlet boxes on this wall. We'll have to remove the west wall panels and goop up the outlets there as well.

We remembered to air seal the outlet boxes on this wall to make the foil insulation cavity of the arch walls as dead as possible. We’ll have to remove the west wall panels and “Duct Seal” up the outlets there as well.

Gooped and closed.

Gooped and closed.

The final two panels are in place! Oh my gosh! Wooooohooooo!

The final two panels are in place! Oh my gosh! Wooooohooooo!

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