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high desert. small house.

Days 340-343: Toilet flange, Caulk & Plumber’s tape

Saturday, 6/18 (Part 2)
High of 99 degrees today.  I was eager to get the dogs out of the apartment so after closing the shack at 2pm, I scooped them up and headed right to the house.  Their dog den under the house is the coolest place for them to chill out.

During a plywood break, Brian tackled the toilet flange attachment with a mix of #12 and #10 stainless screws (#10s were needed to sneak in where the holes were lined up a little less well) .

Jeff made the holes....

Jeff made the 8 toilet flange holes….not the prettiest but the cracks will be hidden under the toilet.  Note that a diamond core bit + normal drill could have made perfect, crackless holes but a hammer drill with masonry bits is faster, doesn’t need water dumped on it for cooling and is free in this case – saving us $15.  Butyl tape has been smushed in for air sealing.

Ta-da!

Ta-da!  This is the Sioux Chief Push Tite flange which we are using instead of the solvent weld model with a stainless steel ring we had.  The bottom line is that the Push Tite one makes installation way easier and if it ever does crack we can unscrew it and replace it without splicing in new sections of solvent welded plumbing.  If we had gone with the solvent weld / stainless one we’d have a hard [impossible] time getting PVC cement on the outside of the pipe in the floor and it would’ve been tricky [impossible] to screw it flat to the floor before the cement set.  An inside mount version of the solvent weld / stainless one might have a chance but not the outside mount one we had [outside mount = receives pipe like a coupler would; inside mount = fits inside the pipe].  Note that an inside mount creates a constriction (down to ~2.5″) but our low-flow toilet’s trapway is smaller than the constriction; hence there is no constriction.

Falling asleep with the heat was quite the challenge and not very restful.

Sunday, 6/19
We had high hopes for the day but the weather had other plans.  It was sooooooooo hot – 99 again.  We countersunk most of the screws in the bathroom and added more screws where needed.  We took a break to start a bike repair project that had been due for several days.  The bike’s rear derailler mounting tab had been bent a bit in shipping and we’d been wanting to straighten it out.

We lucked out when a customer offered to lend us his derailler tab tool – The Park DAG-1.  As we started to use it on Sunday, we found out that the lower run of chain rubbed the tire in the lowest gear, so we also had to re-align the rear wheel to maintain chain clearance.  That means re-re-aligning the derailler and the disc brake as well.  Fast forward 4.5 hours and we found ourselves at 6pm with a bike that was a pleasure to pedal.  We hauled the dogs over to eat and then ran errands.  Weekend over.  Overnight low was in the high 60s.  Poor doggoes.

Bike repair.

The Park Tool  DAG-1 in action.

Monday, 6/20
Brian used 20 “mending plates” ($0.56 each) to create the bridges under the house [supporting unsupported panel edges here and there], and then moved on to securing the plumbing / vent piping with plumber’s tape.  The plumbing inspector said it had to be supported every 4 feet.

I finished countersinking the bathroom screws except for 4-5 in the back corner of the secret closet that I couldn’t reach.  Brian will have to do those.

2016-06-21 15.18.02

View toward the south of the completed plumber’s tape.  The double loop on the far left (bath vent pipe) is super strong enough to withstand dog collision.

Tuesday, 6/21
Brian finished the plumber’s tape installation and also caulked the outside edge of the under-house plywood to prevent sneaky water from getting blown in and pooling.  When I arrived, we discussed whether we’d like to assemble the scaffold or not.  The heat was high and fatigue was setting in….we ended up not doing it.  The forecast called for a 20% chance of rain overnight so we started the completely demoralizing act of moving everything into and underneath the house.

Tomorrow, Brian will move things around and put some stuff back outside so we have room to work inside.  If we can arrive at 5:30pm with some energy then we might put the scaffold supporting monstrosities back in place.

Now that the under-house is completely done, Brian can retire his 2 shirt and 1 thick outer shirt wardrobe that he has been wearing to scoot under the house. Note the holes and dirt accumulation. And yes, he was wearing this getup when it was 99 degrees outside.

Now that the under-house is completely done, Brian can retire his 2 shirt and 1 thick outer shirt wardrobe that he has been wearing to scoot under the house. Note the holes and dirt accumulation. And yes, he was wearing this getup when it was 99 degrees outside.

2 Comments

  1. YOU ALMOST HAVE YOUR OWN BATHROOM. HOW EXCITING!

    • I know! It’s going to be so lovely.

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