Excavation – After

Boyd did an awesome job!  After getting the site specs from us, he told us he wouldn’t need us until he was finished.  We popped by a few times to collect photos and pick up shards of glass but otherwise, he handled everything without a single issue.

The ledge that everybody was afraid of did not show its face at all!  Toward the end of the driveway, against the hill, Boyd did hit a little sandstone.  But that’s no trouble for a bulldozer!  He started at 8am and was done by 3pm.

Guess what surprise greeted us when we came by to complete the walk through?  A giant elevated building pad!  We thought we would be about level with the neighbors but we ended up 15 feet above them!  We were not planning on such a spectacular view or the privacy, but we’ll take them!  The pad also ended up extending closer to the big wash than we anticipated.  That means that the drainage cut Boyd created in the hill above the building pad will lead directly to the wash.  No need to worry about flooding the house from water rushing down the hill!

We came back at the end of the evening to reconstruct a barrier at the start of the driveway.  We used some of the tree parts that were previously there but passed on the rotting railroad ties and random metal pieces.  In addition to the trees, we installed a temporary fence to really communicate the message that the property was private land and was now being developed (see pic of Trooper below).  The fence is intended to stop people coming from Idaho street AND those cutting through Richard’s driveway (which is private property) to connect to Idaho St. Not only did our neighbor’s explanation of the junk wall indicate to us that a blockage was necessary, but we caught an entire troop of mountain bikers cutting across the corner the other day. (And by corner, we mean Richard’s entire [posted] private property and the corner of ours.)

Lo and behold, while installing our fence, a mountain biker came riding down Idaho St.  He introduced himself to us and asked us whether or not the land was private property.  We confirmed that it was.  We chatted a few minutes before he turned around and went back to Cheyenne to go around our newly created roadblock.

He incorporated into the conversation (twice) that many people, over a great period of time, have cut across our corner.  The impression we got was that he was hoping we’d respond by saying, “Please continue!  We really want constant foot traffic and bikers utilizing our private space.”  Instead we just said something like, “Huh, well I’ll be.  Anyway, we’ll eventually be putting up a more permanent fence.  We have an unpredictable rescue dog (Sydney) and the last thing she needs is a constant reason to bark.”

Nice guy and we want to make friends.  But at the same time, we don’t want to create a situation that is difficult to undo later.  All of our immediate neighbors are AWESOME and those are the people we’ll probably encounter most.  They’re all [more than] okay with a fence and with us blocking el traffic de trespassing.  Sorry to end a historical tradition, but….not so sorry.

A quick intro to our neighbors…  See facts below –

  • Richard gave us permission to use his power pole.  This is the sole reason we were able to reduce our power connection estimate from $3-6000 to $0.  ADDITIONALLY, he told us we can lay our driveway over the corner of his lot.  Both of these neighborly gestures have made things simpler for us.  Much appreciated!  By the way, Richard and family has lived there for 40 years!
  • Alison, the neighbor with the dinosaur garage, who explain the rubbish fence, is very nice and cool.  Her two rescue dogs are friends of Trooper.  She has been there for 7 years.
  • We know less about Nigel but he seems cool.  He has been there since before Alison.
  • We met our final neighbor, Mike, this evening.  He and his family live in the trailer to the east of our property and have been there for 14 years.  Nice guy – we apologized for Sydney’s outrageous barking that was underway while he introduced himself and he brushed it off, saying something like, “I have a barker too.  It’s no problem.”

Below are the “after” photos –

New driveway and building pad far far away!

New driveway and building pad far far away!

This is the edge of the driveway - Notice its elevated position relative to the ground near the tree.  The flag on that tree is the edge of our property.

This is the edge of the driveway – Notice its elevated position relative to the ground near the tree. The flag on that tree is the edge of our property.

Treasure unearthed during the driveway excavation

Treasure unearthed during the driveway excavation

Prickly pear remains post excavation - die cactus die!

Prickly pear remains post excavation – die cactus die!

View of building pad toward the east

View of building pad toward the east

North edge of building pad - notice the significant drop down to the cholla forest.  That power pole is the north tip of the diamond.  Because the building pad is so high, we are effectively cut off from that section of the property. That isn't a  problem though because that is the most neighbor dense area.

North edge of building pad – notice the significant drop down to the cholla forest (actually, the camera is a distorting bastard and you can’t really admire the drop with this picture).  That power pole is the north tip of the diamond. Because the building pad is so high, we are effectively cut off from that section of the property. That isn’t a problem though because it is kind of a peninsula between two neighboring properties.

Boyd against the hillside.  This is the south boundary of the building pad.

Boyd against the hillside. This is the south boundary of the building pad.

View of the entire building pad; facing due north

View of the entire building pad; facing due north

View of the building pad from the road.

View of the building pad from the road.  Compare it to the same shot from the previous post to see the progress.

While we measured out where the walls would be on the building pad, Trooper patiently waited near the cars.  He's such a good boy!

While we measured out where the walls would be on the building pad, Trooper patiently waited near the cars. He’s such a good boy!  Notice the temporary fence sections preventing traffic from cutting through the corner.  This is the view to the west.

3 thoughts on “Excavation – After

  1. Merle Webster

    I highly recommend you don’t run your driveway across your neighbors property. He may have good intentions but should he sell and you have to deal with another neighbor, they may not be so accommodating.
    The ground work looks good.

    Reply
    1. admin Post author

      Hi Merle – Thank you for your comment. We agree and have also received permission for a formal easement. Once the surveyor is done, we will have an easement for access to both the power pole and driveway.

      Reply

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